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Charpentiers d'Europe et d'ailleurs
Three handsaws Fabien Marécal using a handsaw to cut a tenon shoulder, 2007.

Although it is mentioned in the Grande encyclopédie, L'Art de charpenterie by Mathurin Jousse (1702), and Joseph Moxon's Mechanick Exercises (1703), it was not until the mid-19th century that the handsaw became a regular part of a carpenter's tools. Its relatively recent appearance in Europe is explained by the difficulty of using traditional methods to forge and polish saw blades. Even as late as the early 20th century, French carpenters were still using bow saws for the lion's share of everyday tasks. Nevertheless, in the Middle Ages, the long handsaw – with its sabre-like appearance and its slanted, fang-like teeth – were used to saw wood lengthwise. This early ancestor of the handsaw disappeared from the iconography sometime in the 16th century.
The blades of Paul Dubois's saws were industrially manufactured (by Peugeot), but Paul often used a gouge to create his own handles. The teeth are all slanted, so that they will bite into the wood, whether it is sawed against or with the grain, for example when cutting tenon shoulders. The smallest saw is known as a keyhole saw, and all of these saws were sharpened with a triangle file.

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Muidorge (France)
Muidorge (France)