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Charpentiers d'Europe et d'ailleurs
Three axes Squaring off beams at a worksite. Anna pleads with Aeneas (detail). 1458.

Throughout his career, just like his forebears, Paul Dubois felled and cut trees with an axe. For him, there were two sorts of axes, which he called, in the regional dialect of Picardy, ch'cuignie à ébauquer (felling axe) and ch'cuignie de taille (finishing axe).
The first has a narrow blade and a long handle, and is used to fell trees as well as to clear away sapwood and trim down logs during squaring-off. The woodsman worked alone, standing over the felled log. He or she made notches every forty centimetres in the side to be trimmed down. The other two axes were used to square off the sides of the beam, following the chalk line that had been traced on its surface. The long-socketed axe is old – Paul inherited it from one of his ancestors. Given the obvious care that went into making it, it dates to at least the first half of the 19th century.
The second, with its more modern socket, was created by the blacksmith Joseph Gallopin in Maulers (Oise) around 1910. Paul's father ordered it from Monsieur Gallopin, who lived near his village. The short, straight handles of both of these finishing axes are made from ash wood, and they each weigh about two kilograms. Both are double-bevelled.

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medias
Muidorge (France)
Muidorge (France)