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Scoop knife, pencil and awl

Scoop knife, awl and lead pencil How to trace a line with an awl, or tracing awl.

Here we have the three main tracing tools used by pre-industrial carpenters, two of which were found in Paul Dubois's toolbox. The scoop knife is a forged and tempered blade that is turned in on itself at one end, forming a thin gouging tool. It is used to make lines or other marks on wood by removing a thin shaving. The handle of the scoop knife is combined with another tool, the tap wrench (or saw wrest), which was frequently used for maintaining saw blades. The scoop knife is an important tool symbolically, because it was used to give voice to the wood, and thus it represents the carpenter's know-how and authority. This is the tool that the builder uses to codify the various pieces of wood–to socialise them, in a way. The scoop knife is useful as a marking tool in every aspect of the worksite, and is used on wood that is rather dry and rough.
The use of the lead pencil, shown here in its brass case, is attested to as early as 1702 in the re-edition of Mathurin Jousse's L’Art de charpenterie, in which it is referred to as a "black stone". It is used in the same way as the other marking tools, although it is rather more of a challenge to use on waterlogged beams.
The awl or tracing awl is shown here, even though we did not find one in Paul Dubois's toolbox. It was used very often as a tracing tool in France up until the 20th century, especially on uneven pieces of wood. The tip of the compass was also frequently used to mark wood, in exactly the same way as the awl.

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medias
Muidorge (France)
Muidorge (France)